Tag: Marital Home move out

Modern Family Problems Divorce and the Home

Divorce and what to do with the home is in the news now that Modern Family actress, Julie Bowen, has listed her home for sale. Although she finalized her divorce from ex-husband Scott Phillips a few years ago, her case raises the issue of housing again.

Home Divorce

Hollywood Hills Home

According to many reports, the couple reached an agreement to split their assets of $25.3 million directly down the middle. In the divorce agreement, Bowen, who first filed for divorce in February, will receive more than $13 million while the real estate investor will receive $12.3 million.

In their marital settlement agreement, Bowen got to keep the Hollywood Hills house, worth $3.1 million at the time. Bowen had purchased the property after the separation.

Phillips, on the other hand, got to keep the couple’s $5.4 million marital home. Details of custody, child support and spousal support were filed in a private settlement agreement.

House and Divorce

I’ve written about the marital house during a divorce before. Generally, the home remains a marital asset, which is subject to equitable distribution, regardless of who lives there during the divorce process.

If a home is marital then both parties have equal rights to buy – out the other’s share. Both may also be on the hook for liabilities.

Until a divorce parenting plan in place, if you are interested in maintaining a meaningful relationship in your child’s life, leaving the home before a timesharing agreement is entered may show a lack of real interest in the child’s daily life.

Moving out can create the appearance of a new ‘primary residential parent’ by default. Worse, if the process takes a long time, it creates a new status quo.

The person leaving during a divorce may still have to contribute for the expenses of the home while also paying for a new home. It can be costly, and prohibitive expensive when you know that the process will take a long time.

Staying in the same home could create an incentive to negotiate a final settlement because living with your soon to be ex-spouse is very uncomfortable. However, if someone moves out, the person remaining in the home is sitting pretty and may be less inclined to settle.

Before moving out, there should be some discussions about maintaining the home and who is paying for which expenses, an inventory should be made of the personal property, artwork, silverware etc., and the boundaries for when the ‘out-spouse’ can use and enjoy the home after vacation

A Modern Family Home

The designer Hollywood Hills pad she purchased in 2017 shortly after splitting from her ex-husband was reportedly worth $3.1 million during the divorce because that was what she paid for it. The mid-century modern time capsule home just off iconic Mulholland Drive is now on the market for $3.85 million.

Designed by architect Thornton Abell, the glass-walled structure is made up of four bedrooms and three baths and spans over 3,200 square feet. Built in 1959 for prominent heart surgeon Augustus Bakos, the home was later acquired by the son of Beach Boys co-founder and guitarist Carl Wilson, who renovated the home and expanded it.

Pegged as “exceedingly private,” the property sits on a long, gated driveway and boasts pastoral canyon and treetop views. Interior features include floor-to-ceiling walls of glass, which are complemented by Palos Verdes stonework, terrazzo floors, custom divider screens and teak cabinetry.

Other interior finishes include a granite and stainless steel kitchen, an expansive master suite with a fireplace, a large walk-in closet and a terrazzo master bath with a glass ceiling.

It also boasts separate guest quarters, a small detached gym in the backyard, a poolside living room and a lush garden atrium. Bowen, 51, had been married to Phillips, a real estate investor, for over 13 years before calling it quits. They share 14-year-old Oliver and 12-year-old twins John and Gustav.

The New York Post article is here.

 

Real Ex-Housewives of OC

Gina Kirschenheiter, one of two new cast members this season on “The Real Housewives of Orange County,” and her husband, Matthew, have decided to divorce, and sell their Coto de Caza house. What goes into the decision to sell the marital home?

Divorce House

Real Trouble in OC

They may live in the lap of luxury, but life isn’t always perfect for the women who reside in one of the wealthiest enclaves of the U.S. The real housewives of OC may continue to focus on living large; plastic surgery, working out, shopping, drinking, and dancing, but real life sometimes intrudes.

The Bravo TV personality filed for divorce from Matthew Kirschenheiter claiming irreconcilable differences. She’s seeking sole physical custody and joint legal custody of their three children, ages 2-5, as well as spousal support.

Once you’ve decided to divorce, new decisions need to be made: who is going to move out of the house, and are you going to sell the house – or not. Florida’s property division statute requires distributing the marital property but is not exactly a how-to guide.

Deciding Whether to Sell

There’s really no right or wrong answer to whether you should sell or keep a house. Your decision will depend on various factors.

Some of the factors influencing the decision to sell are things like your personality, is the house titled in both of your names, are there children, if so, where are the best schools, and how far away are the two parents’ homes.

Equitable Distribution

I’ve written about houses and property divisions before. In every Florida divorce proceeding the court has to set apart nonmarital property and distribute the marital property.

Florida judges always begin with the premise that the property distribution should be equal, unless there is a reason for an unequal distribution based on several factors.

One of the factors the court has to consider is the desirability of keeping the home for the kids or a spouse, if it’s equitable to do so, if it’s in the best interest of the child, and financially feasible.

The Sale

There are problems with keeping a house in which your name is still on title. If your real ex-spouse doesn’t pay the mortgage timely, your credit will suffer. And, if someone invited to your old home is hurt, the injured person will sue the record title owners for damages. If your name is on title as an owner, that’s you! Making sure you keep insurance on the house may be required.

A fresh start and new beginning after a complete division of all of the assets tying you together with your Ex is the best way to go forward for some people.

The Real Housewives couple bought the house in 24-hour, guard-gated Coto de Caza in April 2016 for $840,000, property records show. The gourmet kitchen includes Viking appliances, wooden cabinets and a breakfast nook. There’s also a landscaped backyard with a lawn and barbecue area. The house has a three-car garage and is within walking distance of a community park.

The Mercury News article is here.

 

Leaving or Staying in the Marital Home

On behalf of Ronald H. Kauffman, P.A. posted in Equitable Distribution on Sunday, March 9, 2014.

Should you move out of the house before the divorce is over? One couple was recently ordered to build a wall inside their house to separate them. Many clients wonder if moving out helps or hurts their case. Others wonder if they are losing rights.

Sometimes the arguing gets too intense, and the court must intervene. For one couple in Brooklyn, their arguing resulted in their being ordered to build a wall dividing their home so each could stay in the house peacefully.

This was not just a simple line on the floor as in the 1989 movie: War of the Roses, but an actual wall of plywood and sheetrock through the middle of their house (see picture above). Interestingly, the judge gave the wife the kitchen and the husband the dining room.

The marital home a valuable asset, maybe your most valuable asset, but it is also a place for you to live in . . . with your children – if you have them. Third it is an important, and possibly big part, of the final settlement.

Marital Asset

The home remains a marital asset, which is subject to equitable distribution, regardless of who lives there during the divorce process. If a home is marital then both parties have equal rights to buy – out the other’s share. Both may also be on the hook for liabilities.

Children’s Issues

Until a parenting plan in place, if you are interested in maintaining a meaningful relationship in your child’s life, leaving the home before a timesharing agreement is entered may show a lack of real interest in the child’s daily life. Moving out can create the appearance of a new ‘primary residential parent’ by default. Worse, if the process takes a long time, it creates a new status quo.

Cost

The person leaving may still have to contribute for the expenses of the home while also paying for a new home. It can be costly, and prohibitive expensive when you know that the process will take a long time.

Settlement

Staying in the same home could create an incentive to negotiate a final settlement because living with your soon to be ex-spouse is very uncomfortable. However, if someone moves out, the person remaining in the home is sitting pretty and may be less inclined to settle.

If you Leave

Before moving out, there should be some discussions about maintaining the home and who is paying for which expenses, an inventory should be made of the personal property, artwork, silverware etc., and the boundaries for when the ‘out-spouse’ can use and enjoy the home after vacation

More about the crazy Brooklyn divorce and the separation wall can be read at NBC’s website here.

Stay or Move Out of Home During Divorce?

On behalf of Ronald H. Kauffman, P.A. posted in Agreements on Friday, July 19, 2013.

Many clients going through divorce are unsure if they should stay in the marital home, or move out. Does staying help you? Does leaving mean that you are giving up your rights? Will it be harder to enter an agreement?

The marital home is many things. First, it’s a valuable asset, maybe your most valuable asset – assuming your house isn’t underwater. Second, the home is a place for you to live in . . . with your children if you have them. Third it is an important, and possibly big part, of the final settlement.

Marital Asset

The home remains a marital asset, which is subject to equitable distribution, regardless of who lives there during the divorce process. If a home is marital then both parties have equal rights to buy – out the other’s share. Both may also be on the hook for liabilities.

Children’s Issues

Until a parenting plan in place, if you are interested in maintaining a meaningful relationship in your child’s life, leaving the home before a timesharing agreement is entered may show a lack of real interest in the child’s daily life. Moving out can also create the appearance of a new ‘primary parent’ by default. Worse, if the process takes a long time, it creates a new status quo.

Settlement

Staying in the same home could create an incentive to negotiate a final settlement because living with your soon to be ex-spouse is very uncomfortable. However, if someone moves out, the person remaining in the home is sitting pretty, and may be less inclined to settle.

Also, the person leaving may still have to pay for the home’s expenses while also paying for a second place. It can be costly to maintain two households, and prohibitive expensive when you know that the process will take a long time.

If you are going to leave, you should consider the following before moving:

  • There should be some discussions about maintaining the home.
  • Decide who is paying for which expenses.
  • Inventory the personal property, things like artwork, LP records, clothes, tools, silverware etc.
  • Create boundaries for when the ‘out-spouse’ can use and enjoy the home after leaving it. Create a schedule everyone can agree to.